Kendarius Webster Jersey

After four Rebels were selected on the second day in Nashville, two more joined them in the selection circle, making it six total Ole Miss players taken in the 2019 NFL Draft. Offensive lineman Javon Patterson was selected in the seventh round, 246th overall by the Indianapolis Colts and Kendarius Webster was taken in the seventh round as well, 252nd pick.

Patterson, a native of Petal, Miss., was one of the highest-rated players coming out of high school in 2015. He was the No. 3-rated guard, 52nd overall, and a U.S. Army All-American. At Ole Miss, Javon started 42 games in four years, mostly at offensive guard. He has experience at all three interior positions but will probably have his best shot at finding a home center due to lack of length (6’3).

He should be able to compete right away on the inside with a team that is committed to running the Then came the 2016 opener.

While defending a pass downfield early against Florida State, Webster came down awkwardly and tore several knee ligaments, ending his season early and missing the rest of the season. In doing so, he never seemed to be the same player he once was his final season in Oxford, looking a step slow and not as explosive.

Then the 2019 NFL Combine happened.Ken shocked a ton of NFL scouts and general managers with his impressive sub-4.5 40-yard dash times and things quickly shifted for him and his career. With his 5’11, 203-pound frame, I see Ken making an impact in the NFL as a nickel cornerback, playing close to the line of scrimmage or as a dime safety/linebacker hybrid, utilizing his foot speed while also not compromising his lack of height on an island.football with a trio of dudes, one being a familiar face, former Ole Miss running back Jordan Wilkins.And just six picks after Patterson went to the Colts, Webster heard his name called to the Super Bowl Champion Patriots. Although rated as just a three-star in high school, the Stockbridge, Ga. native held offers from elite programs like Clemson, Georgia, and Florida State when he ultimately decided to choose the Rebels. They apparently saw what the NFL teams began to see once Webster hit the field in Oxford.

After showing promise as a freshman, he started all 13 games as a sophomore and was quickly becoming one of the best cover corners, not only in the Southeastern Conference, but in the country.

Jacob Bailey Jersey

Zane Stokes and Brodie Hinton each drove in three runs as Mobile Christian defeated Daphne 10-8 on Monday.

JT Lastorka had three hits for Mobile Christian. Mississippi State signee Ethan Hearn had two hits, including a double. Hunter Redding had two hits and two RBIs.

Chance Vaught was the winning pitcher. He struck out five. Ethan McPherson pitched two scoreless innings.

Mobile Christian (17-9-1) will host Clarke County in the first round of the best-of-three Class 4A playoffs on Friday. First pitch of Friday’s doubleheader is scheduled for 3:30 p.m.

Jackson Bassett and John Rice combined on a three-hitter and faced the minimum as UMS-Wright defeated Baldwin County 10-0 on Monday to finish the regular season.

Bassett improved to 3-0. He went three innings, allowing one hit with one strikeout.

UMS scored six runs in the bottom of the fifth. Skipper Snypes had three hits and two RBIs. Mitchell Hill had two RBIs and Seth Davis added two hits.

The Bulldogs (16-10) play at Citronelle on Friday in a best-of-three Class 5A playoff series. The first game Friday starts at 4:30 p.m.

Class 7A No. 4 McGill-Toolen swept three games from rival Murphy this week to claim the Class 7A, Area 2 championship. The Yellow Jackets won 11-1, 13-0 and 10-3.

McGill won the opener behind Southern Miss signee Chandler Best (6-1), who allowed an unearned run on two hits in six innings. He struck out 14 and didn’t walk a batter. Auburn signee Nathan LaRue went 2-for-2 with a double, triple and two RBIs. Spencer Hadley had a pair of doubles.

In the second game, LaRue had a two-run triple and Jacob Huff went 2-for-3 with two RBIs. Matthew Glover also had two hits. The Jackets scored all 13 runs in the third inning. Michael Ellis had a two-run single. Spencer Hadley (5-1) went four innings and struck out six to get the win.

Larkin Toth (3-0) got the win in Game 3, allowing seven hits and striking out five in four innings. Will Taylor, Justin Henderson and Sean Mahler each had two hits for the Jackets. Mahler and Henderson also each had three RBIs.

McGill (23-7) will host Theodore in the first round of the Class 7A playoffs next week. First pitch is set for 4 p.m. Friday in the best-of-three series.

Devin Pitre and Cameron Schmidt combined for a one-hitter as Jackson Academy defeated Escambia Academy 6-2. Pitre started and allowed the one hit, a walk and the two runs. Schmidt pitched the final four innings, allowing only two walks and striking out five.

Micah Roberts had a hit and two RBIs. Mathew Windham and Kie Steed had a hit and two runs scored each. Hayden Mills, PJ Fleming, Jack Fleming and Pitre also added a hit.

Byron Cowart Jersey

Armwood High School in Seffner, Fla., is where Byron Cowart earned his stars.

It is where Cowart would go on to be ranked as the top strong-side defensive end in the 2015 recruiting class by Scout and 247Sports. It is where he’d go on to be ranked as the top player across all positions by ESPN and Rivals.

Cowart amassed 185 career tackles and 29 sacks on the way to garnering Florida Class 6A Player of the Year honors. He’d played in a pair of state championships for the Hawks. He’d played in the Under Armour All-America Game.

Now Cowart is 22 years old, and having gone from five-star Auburn recruit to roundabout fifth-round NFL draft pick.

The New England Patriots traded up with the Minnesota Vikings to select Cowart at No. 159 overall on Saturday.

“It was just a sigh of relief,” Cowart told reporters on his introductory conference call. “My mother was excited. It’s just a little weight off my shoulders now because I’ve got another opportunity to live my dreams. It’s definitely a little bit of relief.”

Cowart’s stay at Auburn came to an end after 15 tackles and one forced fumble. He saw action in 26 games and started none before enrolling at Hillsborough Community College to be close to home in the fall of 2017.

Then Cowart signed on with Maryland.

And his time with the Terrapins would span one season.

But Cowart made it count. He started all 12 games he appeared in for Maryland while notching 38 tackles, five tackles for loss, three sacks, one forced fumble and a pair of interceptions. An All-Big Ten honorable mention followed.

So did invitations to the Senior Bowl and NFL Scouting Combine. So did workouts with New England that ended in a phone call and a draft card.

“A lot of people have dreams and they’re not able to achieve them,” said Cowart, who posted a 5.16-second 40-yard dash, 30-inch vertical, 111-inch broad jump and 26 reps on the bench while in Indianapolis. “So, for this to be one of my dreams, and one of my highest dreams – I’m in an organization that I always wanted to be in, playing ‘Madden’ and being around it.”

Cowart checks in at 6-foot-3, 298 pounds and with arms that stretch nearly 34 inches. He checks in with the mold to fill out a Patriots depth chart led by Lawrence Guy, Adam Butler and cost-effective offseason signing Mike Pennel.

David Parry, Frank Herron and hybrid defensive end Ufomba Kamalu round out the interior after 2015 first-rounder Malcom Brown exited on a three-year, $15 million deal with the New Orleans Saints.

But New England’s trade-up for Cowart, which expended No. 162 and No. 239 overall, was player-driven.

“Played defensive end. He was a five-technique in their three-man front,” Patriots director of player personnel Nick Caserio said of Cowart in his post-draft press conference. “They were really a 3-4 defense, so he a played a little bit more five-technique, but probably is a little bit more of a run player. I mean, this guy’s really thick when you see him. He’s well-built, really strong, plays powerful at the point of attack. Did some decent things at Auburn, did some decent things at Maryland, as well.”

New England will see whether the sum of those things adds up.

Cowart recorded four quarterback hits and 21 hurries with a run-stop rate of 7.2% during his campaign at Maryland, according to Pro Football Focus.

“They’ve just told me I have the ability to set the edge or go inside,” Cowart said. “So, they’re going to throw it at me, I believe, and give me the opportunity to show them where I need to be within the defense.”

The past becomes a footnote.

“If a player was highly thought of coming out of high school and was highly recruited, it’s in the background, it’s in the notes,” added Caserio. “And then ultimately, OK, you can think a player is highly thought of in college, then when he gets to the NFL, respectfully, none of that really matters. What’s going to matter is your performance when you’re actually here.”

Jarrett Stidham Jersey

In the days following last week’s draft, there were two questions I got asked more than any others.

“What did you think?”

“What about the quarterback they took?”

The answer to the first was easy. Liked it. Every pick made sense and none of the players were panned by people who know these kids better than me.

The second? Auburn’s Jarrett Stidham throws a beautiful ball but, in the pocket it didn’t take much for him to sense danger and head for the exit.

That may have been a learned response. In his second start for Auburn in the Fall of 2017, Stidham was sacked 11 times by a Clemson defensive line that featured Clelin Ferrell (fourth overall pick to Oakland last week), Christian Wilkins (13th overall to Miami), Dexter Lawrence (17th overall to the Giants). He was sacked 35 times in 13 games for the Tigers that year and the following August, he said, “I learned a lot from the Clemson game. I can promise you I will never get sacked 11 times again.”

And he didn’t. He was sacked 23 times in 2018. But the player who began his career in the Big 12 and ended it in the SEC had put plenty of “I’m outta here!” moments on film.

I got a great description of Stidham’s tendency to bolt this week when speaking to draft expert Dane Brugler from The Athletic.

Curran's AFC Power Rankings: Post-Draft edition

“Inconsistent reaction to pressure,” Brugler said when describing Stidham’s pocket presence.

Brugler also noted that the other strike against Stidham is that he’s a heartbeat slow to process.

“The slow trigger and inconsistent reaction to pressure,” Brugler said. “It’s not like those two things are easily fixable.”

Maybe not. Breaking habits takes time. But Stidham is an incoming freshman in the MIT of offensive football and time is what he’ll be afforded. And he at least sounds like he knows what he doesn’t know.

Asked about being around and learning from Tom Brady, Stidham said, “You can’t play for 20 years and not have so much knowledge of the game, so just being able to sit there and soak up everything that he’s gone through and pick his brain here and there about different things. It’s a tremendous opportunity to learn under him and Brian Hoyer. Obviously Brian’s been around the league for a really long time and has a ton of experience. To be in the same room with those guys and to learn from them, it’s going to be great and I’m really looking forward to it.”

You can watch throw after throw from Stidham on highlights and quickly conclude that he’s got every single thing a quarterback physically needs to succeed.

But there was unanimity in the league and among experts that he is a project and a projection.

“I had Stidham as the top guy in that group (of developmental prospects),” said Brugler. “He was stuck in that Auburn offense where everything is so elementary. He wasn’t able to grow and develop. I think he’s going to get a lot better out of that system. That offense and what they asked him to do really restricted his abilities. From a trait standpoint, he has the athleticism, he has the arm, he needs to quicken that trigger. It’s great that he has the mobility, it’s great that he has the arm but if you don’t’ have the quick trigger and you don’t see things, it’s all moot.

“But if he’s able to show strides and improve in those two areas,” concluded Brugler, “we might be talking about the Patriots flipping him for a second-round pick in a few years.”

WATCH: Stidham celebrates Pats selection

While that’s what the Patriots did with Jimmy Garoppollo, the time wasn’t right for the Patriots to move on from Brady or for Brady to move on from quarterbacking. By the time Stidham’s rookie deal is up it will be the offseason heading into 2023. Brady will be 45 and turning 46. His self-proclaimed expiration date (always an elusive target) will have passed.

In other words, based on timing, no quarterback has ever had a better chance to succeed Tom Brady than Jarrett Stidham. We will see how well he reacts to that particular pressure.

KITCHENS IS SAYING RIGHT THINGS IN CLEVELAND

God bless Freddie Kitchens. The first-year Browns coach is like a modern-day Jed Clampett, just a positional coach minding his own business for 13 NFL seasons with three teams and now he’s in charge of a roster with huge talent and huge personalities in a success-starved football town.

Odds are high he’s going to stub his toe. A lot. And they are even higher that the excessively-hyped Browns will inevitably fall short of 2019 expectations because that’s the way these things go annually. But Kitchens is at least trying to put a governor on the out-of-control gum-flapping going on.

Take, for example, Kitchens’ reaction to second-round pick Greedy Williams’ saying, “I know one thing: that the Browns are going to the Super Bowl this year. That’s a fact.”

That’s adorable. But Williams is playing with adults now and that kind of proclamation only further draws attention to the attention a team that hasn’t won anything is garnering.

Kitchens told Williams to tone it down. He also this week redirected defensive end Myles Garrett after Garrett complained that Gregg Williams, the interim head coach last year, only let him use Garrett use two pass rush moves.

Kitchens defended Williams then added, “We were 7-8-1 so (negativity) may be justified, but moving forward, we are not worried one bit about last year on any area of last year …. Last year is last year. No two teams are the same. I have said that numerous times. You are not going to pick up where you left off. We are not interested in revisiting last year at all. We were 7-8-1. We didn’t do [anything] last year. We didn’t win anything. We were third in the division. I don’t know where all of this is coming from. Just because the Super Bowl is our goal does not mean that is where we are right now. We are a team just like the other 31 teams, and we are focused on training camp, OTAs, minicamp and getting better when those guys are back in the building.”

It’s understandable that we tub-thumpers in the media create hype and excitement with predictions and power rankings. But teams embracing or feeding expectations when there are so many things that can derail them is absurd.

Last year’s anointed team was the Niners. They reveled in the adoration. They went 4-12 and started 1-2 under franchise messiah Jimmy G. before he blew his ACL. Now, they are trying to beat back chatter about tension fraying relationships and dealing with a “win now” vibe.

This year it will be the aforementioned Browns and the Colts who couldn’t be more self-impressed with the job they’ve done.

Kitchens’ instincts are right. Keep pointing out that – despite what it looks like on paper – the potential for plans to go up in smoke is ever-present.

Hjalte Froholdt Jersey

Seventeen selections apart, Yodny Cajuste and Hjalte Froholdt became part of the same plan.

Their first names, pronounced Yod-nee and Yell-duh, go well together. Their roles on the offensive line may very well, too.

Cajuste and Froholdt are pieces of clay for 71-year-old New England Patriots O-line Dante Scarnecchia to sculpt. They’re developmental depth now with the chance to become more later.

That is all New England’s war room could have aimed for in the third and fourth rounds of the 2019 NFL draft.

The Patriots went with West Virginia’s Cajuste at pick No. 101 overall, and he’ll join a group of offensive tackles that is headlined by last year’s first-rounder in Isaiah Wynn and the longstanding Marcus Cannon. Cajuste, measuring in at 6-foot-5 and 312-pounds, should contend to be the team’s top swing tackle as a rookie. He started 30 games for the Mountaineers despite not playing football until his senior year at Florida’s Miramar High School.

Cajuste redshirted at West Virginia in 2014 before taking his place on the blindside. The basketball convert would finish having been first-team and second-team All-Big 12, as well as the conference’s co-offensive lineman of the year after not allowing a sack in 2018. He’d garner second-team All-America honors in the process.

But Cajuste, who at one point in the process was pondered as a potential top-50 draft choice, missed action with a knee sprain and a torn ACL during his 2015 and 2016 seasons in Morgantown. He opted out of his invite to the Senior Bowl due to an ankle injury, and did not test in 40-yard dash, three-cone drill, shuttle, vertical or broad jump while at the NFL Scouting Combine.

Cajuste later underwent quad surgery.

“He played in a passing system,” Patriots director of player personnel Nick Caserio said of Cajuste in his press conference following the selection. “He’s a fairly athletic kid. I think he’s a three-year starter. He’s a player we spent time with at a couple of different checkpoints here.”

With Wynn coming off a torn Achilles that robbed him of his rookie campaign after only nine preseason snaps, Cajuste adds a layer of insurance. And with Cannon now 31 years old and carrying team-friendly cap hits well below $8 million through 2021, Cajuste also adds a layer of youth that could be applied on the right side.

“I feel like I’m a hard worker,” Cajuste said on his introductory conference call. “I take coaching well. I feel like I’m just ready to be a New England Patriot. I’m just blessed to be in this position.”

The $66 million Trent Brown and fellow tackle LaAdrian Waddle departed from Foxborough for the Oakland Raiders and Buffalo Bills, respectively, in free agency.

As for Arkansas’ Froholdt, whose card was filled out by New England at No. 118 overall, he can be penciled in as both a backup center behind captain David Andrews and a 2020 name to monitor at left guard. The 6-foot-4, 306-pound Froholdt began playing football at age 12 in Denmark and arrived in the United States as a foreign-exchange student for his sophomore year of high school. He’d go from Ohio’s Warren G. Harding back to Denmark and later returned by way of IMG Academy in 2014.

“I always had an interest in football, but mainly it was because I wanted the American experience,” Froholdt told reporters on his call. “I wanted to get better at football and take it back to Denmark and maybe play a little bit better back in Denmark and learn something. But, of course, there’s always been dreams and we kind of just talked about how it seemed unrealistic about college and the NFL and whatnot. It was never really the intention – I came over wanting to get a supersized meal and drive some big cars, and it turned out as something really different.”

Really different.

Current Patriots defensive consultant Bret Bielema recruited Froholdt to Arkansas. And there he’d transform from a freshman defensive tackle to a 37-game starter on the offensive side the rest of the way. A second-team All-SEC nod followed for Froholdt, who logged work at left guard and center. So did trips to the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl and Indianapolis for a player who allowed a quarterback pressure on only 1.2% of pass-blocking snaps last fall, according to Pro Football Focus.

“He ended up playing basically three years as a starter and never missed a game,” Caserio said of Froholdt’s stay with the Razorbacks. “He played against a number of good players and a number of good people. He’s smart, got good size. He’s got pretty good playing strength. He can play multiple positions inside there.”

Froholdt will vie for the top backup interior spot with holdovers Ted Karras, Brian Schwenke and James Ferentz. A year down the road, he could be the in-waiting left guard should ironman Joe Thuney’s market surpass New England’s checkbook.

Those designs won’t be drawn out overnight.

But in Yodny and Hjalte, the Patriots drafted options. Options that are better off a year early than a year late. Options that just so happen to have a ring to them.

Yodny Cajuste Jersey

Seventeen selections apart, Yodny Cajuste and Hjalte Froholdt became part of the same plan.

Their first names, pronounced Yod-nee and Yell-duh, go well together. Their roles on the offensive line may very well, too.

Cajuste and Froholdt are pieces of clay for 71-year-old New England Patriots O-line Dante Scarnecchia to sculpt. They’re developmental depth now with the chance to become more later.

That is all New England’s war room could have aimed for in the third and fourth rounds of the 2019 NFL draft.

The Patriots went with West Virginia’s Cajuste at pick No. 101 overall, and he’ll join a group of offensive tackles that is headlined by last year’s first-rounder in Isaiah Wynn and the longstanding Marcus Cannon. Cajuste, measuring in at 6-foot-5 and 312-pounds, should contend to be the team’s top swing tackle as a rookie. He started 30 games for the Mountaineers despite not playing football until his senior year at Florida’s Miramar High School.

Cajuste redshirted at West Virginia in 2014 before taking his place on the blindside. The basketball convert would finish having been first-team and second-team All-Big 12, as well as the conference’s co-offensive lineman of the year after not allowing a sack in 2018. He’d garner second-team All-America honors in the process.But Cajuste, who at one point in the process was pondered as a potential top-50 draft choice, missed action with a knee sprain and a torn ACL during his 2015 and 2016 seasons in Morgantown. He opted out of his invite to the Senior Bowl due to an ankle injury, and did not test in 40-yard dash, three-cone drill, shuttle, vertical or broad jump while at the NFL Scouting Combine.

Cajuste later underwent quad surgery.

“He played in a passing system,” Patriots director of player personnel Nick Caserio said of Cajuste in his press conference following the selection. “He’s a fairly athletic kid. I think he’s a three-year starter. He’s a player we spent time with at a couple of different checkpoints here.”

With Wynn coming off a torn Achilles that robbed him of his rookie campaign after only nine preseason snaps, Cajuste adds a layer of insurance. And with Cannon now 31 years old and carrying team-friendly cap hits well below $8 million through 2021, Cajuste also adds a layer of youth that could be applied on the right side.“I feel like I’m a hard worker,” Cajuste said on his introductory conference call. “I take coaching well. I feel like I’m just ready to be a New England Patriot. I’m just blessed to be in this position.”

The $66 million Trent Brown and fellow tackle LaAdrian Waddle departed from Foxborough for the Oakland Raiders and Buffalo Bills, respectively, in free agency.

As for Arkansas’ Froholdt, whose card was filled out by New England at No. 118 overall, he can be penciled in as both a backup center behind captain David Andrews and a 2020 name to monitor at left guard. The 6-foot-4, 306-pound Froholdt began playing football at age 12 in Denmark and arrived in the United States as a foreign-exchange student for his sophomore year of high school. He’d go from Ohio’s Warren G. Harding back to Denmark and later returned by way of IMG Academy in 2014.

“I always had an interest in football, but mainly it was because I wanted the American experience,” Froholdt told reporters on his call. “I wanted to get better at football and take it back to Denmark and maybe play a little bit better back in Denmark and learn something. But, of course, there’s always been dreams and we kind of just talked about how it seemed unrealistic about college and the NFL and whatnot. It was never really the intention – I came over wanting to get a supersized meal and drive some big cars, and it turned out as something really different.”

Really different.

Current Patriots defensive consultant Bret Bielema recruited Froholdt to Arkansas. And there he’d transform from a freshman defensive tackle to a 37-game starter on the offensive side the rest of the way. A second-team All-SEC nod followed for Froholdt, who logged work at left guard and center. So did trips to the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl and Indianapolis for a player who allowed a quarterback pressure on only 1.2% of pass-blocking snaps last fall, according to Pro Football Focus.

“He ended up playing basically three years as a starter and never missed a game,” Caserio said of Froholdt’s stay with the Razorbacks. “He played against a number of good players and a number of good people. He’s smart, got good size. He’s got pretty good playing strength. He can play multiple positions inside there.”

Froholdt will vie for the top backup interior spot with holdovers Ted Karras, Brian Schwenke and James Ferentz. A year down the road, he could be the in-waiting left guard should ironman Joe Thuney’s market surpass New England’s checkbook.

Those designs won’t be drawn out overnight.

But in Yodny and Hjalte, the Patriots drafted options. Options that are better off a year early than a year late. Options that just so happen to have a ring to them.

Damien Harris Jersey

For the second year in a row, the Patriots drafted a prominent running back from college football’s Southeastern Conference. New England will hope that third-round pick Damien Harris is as productive as a rookie as Sony Michel was a year ago.

The obvious question will be exactly where the Alabama running back fits into the Patriots’ increasingly crowded backfield.

New England’s current depth chart lists Harris behind Michel, James White, and Rex Burkhead. He’ll also compete with Brandon Bolden (recently re-signed after a year with the Dolphins).

Harris, who was the No. 8 overall recruit according to Rivals in 2015, has the ability to contribute right away. At the very least, he will provide depth in case the Patriots encounter injuries in 2019.Here are a few other things to know about the newest Patriots running back:
He’s a ‘football player’ by the Patriots’ definition.

The term “football player” is used in describing some of the classic Patriots (extending even to Adam Vinatieri). More than compartmentalized dominance of a particular position, stereotypical Bill Belichick players are prized more for their versatility. They aren’t just good kickers or running backs, but are instead “football players” who are good in multiple roles.

With Harris, it’s clear that the Patriots see him in this mold.

“Whatever else you’re looking at, he falls into the good football player category that’s been consistently productive over the course of however many years,” Patriots director of player personnel Nick Caserio said after the draft.

At Alabama, Harris rushed for 2,913 yards in the three seasons he was prominently involved in the offense. He scored 20 rushing touchdowns in his final two years, combining elusiveness with power when he carried the ball.

Yet Harris also contributed as an effective blocker, and was willing to serve on special teams. In the 2017 season opener against Florida State, Harris — who started the game at tailback and would also score a touchdown — also blocked at a punt.His well-rounded ability could fit in well with the Patriots.
He’s used to competing for carries.Though he arrived on campus as a five-star recruit out of high school, Harris wasn’t just given the starting running back job. After all, Alabama regularly carries the nation’s best recruiting class.

Of the Crimson Tide running backs Harris competed with for carries, virtually every single one was (or will be) drafted into the NFL as well.

Fierce competition within his own positional group is a theme that will carry over in New England. Given the productivity the Patriots already have at the position, Harris will be part of a committee. That said, his college experience means he already understands the benefits of this strategy.“Being here I see it as more of an advantage than a disadvantage,” said Harris of splitting carries in 2017. “A lot of people think it takes away from how many carries you get or how many yards you potentially get or how much attention you get from being the premier guy at a program like Alabama, but I think that it helps you in the long run because it’s a long a season.

“Over the course of 14, 15 games throughout the course of a long season, it’s nice to have guys come in and split reps with you and split time with you. It keeps you from getting banged up. It keeps you from being tired and worn down throughout the year. I kind of think that’s one of the advantages of having a lot of guys.”
Like Tom Brady, Harris found success in a dietary choice.

While Brady has the TB12 Method, which includes a strict set of principles that he applies to his diet, Harris has a more straightforward method.Prior to his junior season, Harris was caught from behind in the open field by tacklers on several occasions. He set out to remedy the problem during the offseason, and adopted a new diet. The hardest thing he had to give up?

“Honey Buns,” Harris told reporters in 2017. “I love Honey Buns. I haven’t had one in months, since probably June or July, and it hurts to talk about it.”

Alabama’s Twitter account savored the accomplishment with a special highlight video:His opinion of Tom Brady is not in question.

On multiple occasions (including the aftermath of Super Bowl LI), Harris has shared some Twitter thoughts on Brady.

Chase Winovich Jersey

Since 2001, the New England Patriots have been the most dominant team in the NFL for many reasons. It all simply comes down to the fact that they thoroughly understand every facet of the game.

No team has been more efficient year-round, and the 2019 NFL Draft was another testimony of that. The Patriots came into the draft with 12 draft picks — which was more than any other team — and they replenished most positions of need.

The No. 77 pick was one that really stood out and could prove to be their most valuable player from the draft. Defensive end Chase Winovich from Michigan is a unique player that could bring a personality and work ethic that thrives in the New England environment.

Winovich is a 6-foot-3, 255 pound defensive end that has an extraordinarily high motor. He isn’t a player that had the most phenomenal numbers on paper, after recording 59 tackles, 15.5 tackles for loss and five sacks in his senior season. He is a player that has the intangibles to thrive in the NFL, and he was fortunately paired up with Bill Belichick as his head coach.

Michigan’s defensive coordinator Don Brown spoke to the Boston Herald on Monday, and believes that Winovich will fit perfectly into Belichick’s system.

“He’s a trip, no question, but he’s a very serious football player,” Brown said. “He’s one of those guys who loves the game, plays the game the right way all the time. You never have to worry about his effort. He’s going to give you everything he’s got . . . I think going into Coach Belichick’s system, this is probably a match made in heaven for him.”

He holds similar characteristics to Rob Gronkowski, who fit perfectly into the system. And, he even has a little tight end experience in his background.

“We stood him up as an outside linebacker. His primary goal was to go hunt the quarterback. But there’s no question, he can drop back and cover,” Brown said. “He has tight end in his background. He has hands, he can catch. This offseason, getting ready for the combine, he trained a lot standing up, dropping into the flat, playing coverage, working on his hands. So he can do those things. We just didn’t ask him. The priority for us was to get him around the quarterback. But he can do it all. There’s no doubt about that.”

The ceiling is so high for Winovich because of his extensive experience on both sides of the ball. Michigan needed him primarily as a pass rusher, so he focused on that one goal and his statistics are a reflection of that. But, Belichick will have the entire offseason to understand Winovich’s game and really expand upon his role. The Patriots want players that can do it all, and he will be an experimental player with many different capabilities.

Not only is Winovich a great athlete that has drive and compassion for the game — but he cares very much about his community. He worked closely with The ChadTough Foundation, and had a goal to raise $15,000. He met the goal, and eventually raised more than $200,000. He wants to make an impact on the community, and the NFL will be the perfect platform.

“I have a vision for making millions for some charity. I want to give back more than just a few hundred thousand. I want to have a real impact on society, and a positive one at that,” Chase said. “I feel like I’ve laid the groundwork and that’s why this process is so exciting for me. I feel like I had kind of a playground where I can experiment and learn about myself in this new role. And I’m studying almost like in the game, like how people treat me versus how they did and what kind of things, just kind of connections and leverages that you can kind of acquire.”

The Patriots found a high-character and talented player that will make a tremendous impact on and off the field with their No. 77 pick. This is just one small story in the incredible journey of Belichick and the New England Patriots.

Joejuan Williams Jersey

It is a once-in-a-lifetime moment to hear your name called at the NFL Draft. Few things can make that experience even sweeter, but when Joejuan Williams was selected in the second round, he walked on stage in Nashville, the city where he grew up, started playing football and went to college.

It doesn’t get much sweeter than that.

“It was definitely special. It was a long time coming. Growing up here, going to school here, high school here, middle school, elementary school, college, it was definitely special to hear my name called here in Nashville too,” Joejuan said. “Everything I do, I try to represent for the 615, and that’s what I’m going to try to do once I get to the next level.”

That dream of the next level came true when the Patriots selected Joejuan with the 45th overall pick on Friday night. Dont’a Hightower called his name, and just like that, Joejuan was a Patriot.

“Me and Dont’a talked a couple of days ago at an event, and then we talked right before the draft started today,” Joejuan said Friday night. “He definitely said that they wanted me on the squad and he wants me on the squad. Just to hear my name called on that team and to play beside them and play beside all those guys, I’m definitely looking forward to it.”

But before the next chapter begins, there are some things that Patriots Nation has to learn about Joejuan beyond his performance on the football field.

Joejuan attended Vanderbilt University, and before the Draft, the school’s athletics department put out a 10-minute documentary that follows Joejuan through the Combine and NFL Pro Day process. In the documentary, he talks openly about the struggles he and his family faced growing up in Nashville. His mother, Stephanie Roberts, raised Joejuan and his brother on her own, working multiple jobs and facing eviction.

“We hit a lot of low points, but through that, she always tried to show her love for her kids,” Joejuan said.

Joejuan’s father isn’t in his life, but he said that his father was a prominent football player in Tennessee. This motivated Joejuan to excel in football.

“I wanted to be better than him at everything I did in life,” he said.

The feature is worth watching in its entirety.

Football isn’t his only passion, either. Joejuan told “Good Morning Football” that he is an avid drawer and is into anime.

“I’ve been drawing since I remember, since I was 5, 6,” he told the hosts. “I’ve always loved to draw.”

And his interest in anime will surely be well-received by his new Patriots teammates, several of whom have bonded over their shared interest. One of those Patriots is Adam Butler, who also played for Vanderbilt.

During his appearance on “Good Morning Football,” Peter Schrager had an intuitive moment, and he turned out to be spot on.

“I’m listening to this kid speak. I feel like you’re a New England Patriot already,” he said. “Like this is it. This is what Belichick’s dream prospect is.”

Hey, good call, Peter. Welcome to New England, Joejuan.

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Q: How do you feel about catching passes from Tom Brady?

NH: I’m extremely excited. I’m just ecstatic to come in, work hard, constantly improve and just live up to the expectations.

Q: Did you have any sort of pre-draft contact with the Patriots, and if so, what was that like?

NH: Yes, I had a visit with the Patriots and I felt that it went really well. I feel like I meshed with the coaches very well and I just feel like I fit in with the team and everything very well.

Q: What kind of clicked for you with the Patriots?

NH: I just feel like the way I retained some of the information as far as some of the plays they were going over with me. Also, I just felt like coming in, I’ll be expected to know a lot and be prepared, and I’m ready for that.

Q: Did you feel like you were going to be drafted either at 32 to the Patriots or at 33 to Arizona?

NH: I did going in. I just had a feeling. Obviously, I didn’t know exactly what was going to happen, but I did just kind of have a feeling.

Q: Can you lean on your college teammate Christian Sam at all to help get you acclimated to what life is going to be like in New England?

NH: Yes, most definitely. That will be one of the guys that I talk to right off the bat, just trying to get some advice, just trying to do well and be prepared and know the expectations and everything.

Q: You’re the first receiver Bill Belichick has drafted in the first round since he’s become coach of the Patriots. What does that mean to you?

NH: It means the world to me. For him to have that much faith in me and to have that much trust in me, it just makes me want to work that much harder. So, I’m going to come in with a workhouse mindset and get better every day.

Q: Coach Herm Edwards compared you a little bit to Dez Bryant. Is there a guy who is in the league now or was in the league the last handful of years who you model your game after a little bit?

NH: It’s hard to say. I have a lot of respect for everybody that has played at the NFL level. I have so much to learn, I have so much to handle coming into the game, coming into the NFL. It’s hard to really give a comparison.

Q: How would you describe your game?

NH: I would describe my game as very passionate. I play with a lot of passion. Whenever that ball is in the air, I’ll sacrifice anything to go get it and I’ll do whatever it takes to help the team win. Anything Coach wants me to do, whether it’s on special teams, offense, anything, I’ll do it just to do my part and to be one piece of the puzzle in helping us win.

Q: Do you hope to expand your route tree when you get to New England?

NH: That’s not really up to me too much – it’s all on what the coaches want from me. I’m going to come in with the mindset of being very coachable. I’ve always been a very coachable player, just picking up on things very quickly. Whatever they need me to do or want me to do, I’ll get on it right away.

Q: You played for Herm Edwards, who spent a lot of time in the NFL. Did he discuss NFL life with you? How do you feel like playing for him prepared you for this next step you’re about to take?

NH: Yeah, Herm helped me a lot with some of the conversations he had with me this past year. He was just telling me that I just had to always be ready, I had to take everything to a whole new level – the way I study, the way I do everything. It’s obviously a new level, and I have to prove myself all over again.

Q: What do you remember about meeting Bill Belichick?

NH: What do I remember? He was a very great man. I feel like a lot of people just think of him as just an uptight person, but he was very relatable. We were in there smiling, cracking jokes, so I got a very good vibe from him and I’m looking forward to talking to him tomorrow, as well.

Q: What jokes did he tell you?

NH: We were just talking, just commentating. I can’t really tell you exactly what we were talking about, but we were just having a good time just [conversing].

Q: The Patriots have a couple bigger receivers who have been really good after the catch in Josh Gordon and Demaryius Thomas. Are those guys you have admired over the years, and what do you think you can learn from them?

NH: Yeah, definitely. I’ve admired every player that’s ever played in the NFL, no matter what round they got drafted, no matter how long they played the game. If they played in the NFL, I’ve admired them, and those are dudes that have been in the NFL and have played at a high level. So, going in, I’ll definitely be leaning on them, asking them how to get better and just how to improve day by day.

Q: What was the moment like for you when you got the call and found out you were going to the reigning Super Bowl champions?

NH: It was so surreal, especially for me, waiting that long and getting to the end of the first round. I was honestly starting to think maybe I had to start getting ready for Day 2. So, when I got that call, I tried not to be emotional, but I couldn’t really hold it back at that point. I just felt so blessed, I was so thankful for the Patriots organization. I was just thanking God and I’m just ready to get to work.

Q: Where did you watch the draft?

NH: I was with my family. We actually rented out a house in Scottsdale, so a lot of my family was here. They actually got their visas not too long ago, so they flew in last week. A lot of my friends were here – you know, people that have just been by my side since Day 1. So, it was an extremely special moment for all of us.

Q: About how many people were with you?

NH: I would say close to 50, 50-60 people.

Q: Can you tell us where your family is from?

NH: My family is from St. Vincent and the Grenadines. It’s a small island in the Caribbean. So, my grandmother and I and one of my aunties have just been by ourselves out in Arizona. I’ve been extremely blessed with the people that have been around me, with the company that has been around me. I feel like I was blessed with people that have the same mindset as me, people that want to improve, people that want to learn, people that want to grow. So, you know, God has really blessed me throughout the years.

Q: Are there any other NFL players from St. Vincent and the Grenadines?

NH: No, I’m the first one.

Q: When did you first start playing football?*

NH: I first started playing football – you know, I was playing flag at a very young age, probably like 7 years old, and then I played tackle for a year or two when I was probably about 10 years old and I had stopped all the way up until my freshman year of high school. That’s kind of when it picked back up and that’s kind of when I really got settled into the sport.

Q: Do you have any preference of playing in the slot or on the outside, or do you like to move around a lot like you did at ASU?

NH: No, no preference. I just want to do my part to help win, whatever that is, whatever that looks like. I just want to come in and be one of those players that Coach can rely on no matter what he tells me. That’s what I know is expected of me, and that’s what I’m ready for.

Q: But you do have the versatility and skillset to play inside and outside?

NH: Yes sir, I do. So, whatever Coach wants me to do – if he wants me to do one or the other or both – I wouldn’t hesitate to jump at it.